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and the great government consulting as they pick the products to bring a lot of innovation to san francisco. cory? give cory a round of applause. [applause] >> thank you, chris. thank you so much for all of your hard work, chris. none of this could be possible without your efforts. good evening. the good government awards are incredibly important in san francisco. it's a chance for us to honor the tremendous work that happens in the city and also to honor the individuals who are responsible for some of that success. congratulations to all of our honorees. we're very grateful for your work. let's give a hand for them. [applause] the good government awards also support spur's good government work. it is a central part of our mission. our agenda is admittedly ambitious. we analyze every local measure on the san francisco ballot, which until recently was a pretty formidable task. we participate in most of the major issues of city government from pension and payroll tax reform to some of the most important discussions on how we fund a lot of our public services, whether that finding different re
to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show us in a very positive way. from my perspective, it's important for us to keep on pushing data sets that
someone who has worked in government for 23 years, i've been at those departments like dpw and others where we think in one dimension. this is where we clean the streets. this is how often we clean it. this is when we tell the cars to move off. and this is what dpw does and it does it pretty well within that constraint. if you shared that data with companies who are looking at where do people live, how -- what their patterns are, we can get a lot more creative. when we open our data, when we suggest to departments that they can work in collaboration, when we open up and establish within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish small businesses that will improve the way we live and work and play
. the government can't and should not shoulder theç entire challenge ofçç responseç, recovery, and prepared this. prior to theirç administration, nobody would really say that out loud. we became an agency trying to be everything to everybody at the worst possible time for all of us. it is their leadership and tenacity to hone in one this one psychological culture shift in speaking about earthquakes that is a real seismic shift in the way we look at things. we are honored to have him here for a few minutes today. the deputy administrator. [applause] ç>> good morning. it is truly a pleasure to be back here in san francisco. i was here a few months ago for the anniversary of theç loma pr ieto earthquake. in talking to a lot of folks and listening to the mayor, the mayor getsç it. i come from the city in the çnortheast. i spent a little bit of time in boston. i had a career before i came to fema to 0.5 years ago. boston and san francisco are similar in many ways. you have a mayor that is passionate about emergency management. you have a group of people in emergency managementç not o
>> good afternoon welcome to the government oversight audit committee. my name is carmen chu. with supervisors cohen and campus. mdm. clerk we have announcements? >> clerk calonsag: turn off all electronic devices; submit cards for any speakers. each member will be allotted the same number of minutes to speak in each item. items will appear on the february 5 supervisor meeting. >> would you call item 1. >> clerk calonsag: ordinance amending the san francisco administrative code by adding sections 6.22 q and 6.42 f to require a public works contractors to pay subcontractors. >> chair: this is an item that we have been working on for quite some time. catie chang in my office among other folks and contractors have been working on ways to improve the way that we do business. one of the areas is reducing withholdings to make sure we are not the bottleneck for many of the local businesses and many small businesses and also what we can do to improve the issue of prompt payment. especially during the past few years the idea of how it is the city processes payment and get them bac
amazing people, and we in city government have an opportunity to address so many problems and make so many things better. the campaign was a learning experience on so many levels. beyond that, i think you've learned something about yourself when you are putting yourself out there through the political process. i was very lucky that i had that opportunity because where i come from something as basic as free, democratic elections, that is a luxury. people participate in the democratic process. that is something that is quite amazing and remarkable. i think that you do not fully appreciate it if you have had it all your life. whereas someone who came from a place where that was not possible, i think that i have a unique appreciation for it. it was really an exciting thing to do. >> where would you place yourself now on the political spectrum? the left, the right? supervisor campos: i think the labels can mean a lot of different things. i see myself as someone who ultimately has tried to make things better for people. i have a progressive outlook in terms of how i see things. by progressive i
majority in the house. that is a governing majority. he's going to have it on immigration and also on the debt ceiling. not sure he's going to have it on guns, but he's going to drive the really hard-line republicans crazy because he's going to be able to break off 40 or 50 of them for all these other things. chris: that seems to be true as much as the opposition is hotter and perhaps hardening out there on the right. it does seem that the center right and the center are in play and obama is making his move toward them successfully. >> their governing philosophy coming in is that the fever would break among the tea party folks, among the hard right, and also that just folks in the house would sort of move to the boehner philosophy, which is a governing philosophy. the sort of -- chris: in other words, you don't need a majority of the republicans to rule. >> you break the rule, which is what he's done on these big-ticket items. they have been meeting over these last couple of days to figure out wait forward. i think the president was smart to step into these debates early and often
on government audits and oversight, and looking forward to working with this committee. i want to say that this is a very sound piece of legislation. it makes a great deal of sense. i like the fact that we are among the things conforming with state laws; it makes a great deal of sense to also provide certainty and clarity for the subcontractors that are impacted by this issue. and i would like to ask that my name be added as a cosponsor. >> chair: thank you very much supervisor. i would like to say that the small business commission has also acted to support this legislation as well. >> i make a motion to move this forward, the process of recommendation. >> chair: we can do that without objection. item 2. gvl(gavel) clk>> clerk calonsag: performance audit housing authority. >> chair: this is brought by a number of supervisors. supervisor campos, do you have opening comments? >> supervisor campos: i will be brief in my comments. since i was elected supervisor four years ago, we have heard from time to time from a number of residents from the public housing developments about i
to a large variety of the government sectors. in february 2008 the jewish coalition held a conference against human trafficking which included agencies such as the san francisco commission on the status of women, representative of the mayor's office and other nonprofits. this event also attracted members of the state assembly and a few congressional offices. at a meeting following our conference a i was asked to chair the larger group and my condition was that there be a cochair from the mayor's office at that time was catherine dodd. the san francisco collaborative against human traffic was born. in 2010 - from the beginning emily morassie (sounds like) executive director of the san francisco commission on the status of women was always involved as well as theresa sparks, executive director of the human rights commission. they were not only the core of the beginning but also generously offered to help us and support us and today that is where we are housed. we have a membership of over 28 agencies public and private representing a wide area of government agencies, law enforcem
a new coalition government. >> sreenivasan: and ray suarez updates the high-powered meetings of heads of state, business leaders, and others at the world economic forum in davos, switzerland. >> brown: from mali, lindsey hilsum looks at tensions caused by government troops as they advance into islamist territory. >> sreenivasan: spencer michels has a story about trash and one city's crusade to eliminate all of it. >> reporter: san francisco boasts that it recycles 80% of all garbage, and is aiming for zero waste. but some skeptics don' believe it. >> brown: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnee.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for
. the details are in, senator diane fine sign is laying out the plan. and guess who gets a pass? government officials, we report, you decide. >> tucker: it could be a super bowl, why they want to go no booze at all during the biggest game of the year. >> right. >> clayton: and plus we showed you the half court hero, the incredible shot tackled by lebron. >> and half court hooker, he probably enjoyed the hug by lebron. >> and now tackled by taxes, and make $75,000, see if he gets to keep any of it. >> "fox & friends" begins right now. ♪ >> good morning, i hope you had a great weekend. >> clayton: yeah, ainsley earhart here, tucker carlson, ainsley fresh off the return to the gun range down there in texas. >> that was so fun. >> clayton: did you fire an a-47. >> no. >> were you nervous? >> i was down in katy, texas, offering free classes to teachers in the area. the class full of teachers and we interviewed why they were doing that and even though you're not allowed to take guns in flarms yet and hoping that does pass the state of texas. >> you looked great down there and we'll talk more a
better support the school district in the state and federal government has been unable to. given the crisis that has emerged of the data taking fourth in the summer juniors and sophomores, and seeing the data that almost half of those students are not on track to graduate, i felt that this was an appropriate and important way for our city to support the school district. i want to say again, i understand the debate that we have been engage again. i truly respect my colleagues that have been talking about finding other sources of funds for the school district. i do think that this is a good use of our state reserve funds. i think that when it is a question of our kids, about helping them graduate, for me it is never a question in this will always be a priority use of the funds. as we move forward i look forward to a continued dialogue with the mayor's office, the school district, about how we can continue to better support embedded partner with the school district. through this conversation it has been quite fruitful, looking at a lot of different avenues even if we are not able t
that are going to allow for continuing operations of the federal government. the debt ceiling and sequestration for the debt ceiling, congressionally established limit on the amount of the public debt reached in the final days of 2012, and through emergency borrowing measures the treasury was able to continue funding the federal government. these issues should be revisited again probably in the next week. it's been quiet in dc this week. the sequestration act will allow federal obligations possibly is in this mid-february. the sequestration that was supposed to take effect on january 1 prevented cats to all discretionary funding programs. the highway trust fund that primarily funds the highway and transit account is protected, would not have been subjected to the sequestration got. the new starts funding programs, new source of funding for the central suburb project, we are keeping a close eye on that because there is a potential cut to the program. we are also keeping an i on the continuing resolution for the federal appropriations level. in october. in october 1, there was a six-m
was in the late 1990's, 2000's. people are talking a lot about issues on stability and asking government, like ours, to be with them in the long term, and to create relationships. certainly, for capital investors, it really is that relationship building. they want that face-to-face time with investors around our city. so we are creating conditions for that to happen. they are not short-term leases, these are long-term leases. twitter signed in for a good 10 years. others have signed long-term leases as well. they are in it for the long haul. i think they are measuring their success, building it up on that. not only innovating and starting up, we want them to stay and grow. we have been creating those conditions for that conversation to happen. >> michael connolly said, anything to add to that? is this the right time in the valley? is there a bubble? >> i would like to speak about the clean technology sector. there was a little bit of a bubble that emerged in 2005, 2006, 2007 time frame. what has happened since then is you see the landscape changed. there have been a lot of companies and vc's,
employees will face furloughs and reduced paychecks by april. the government of syria called today for thousands of refugees to come home, including those opposed to the regime. nearly 600,000 syrians have fled the civil war and gone to neighboring countries. there's been a new surge this week. we have a report narrated by alex thomson of independent television news. >> the children say they double-checked their figures. they counted around 10,000 children in the overcrowded camps in jordan in just the past 24 hours, with the parents or gardens they recognized around 20,000 people in all. with the winter cold and conditions like this, in the camps, king abdullah of jordan took the might of these people to the top today, to the world economic summit in davous. >> jordan is hosting almost 300,000. the weakest ref gos are struggling now just to survive this year's harsh winter. more international support is desperately needed. and it's only going to get worse. >> back there syria it is indeed getting worse. these people filmed getting out and leaving in the past 24 hours. it's partly
yesterday with one reference to the deficit. if no debt limit is reached, however, the government could default on its obligations within weeks so watch that story. martha: well, this is an interesting one. pro golfer, phil mickelson, doing a little bit of backpedaling today saying he regrets the public comments he made on the issue of his taxes in california. mickelson said he may move out when he made the original comments, of the state, because all taxes combined end up to more than 60% tax rate. now he is telling fox news contributor jim gray, quote, finances and taxes are a personal matter and i should not have made a opinions of, on them public. i apologize to those who i have upset or insulted and i assure you i intend not to let it happen again. why would he feel the need to do that? stuart varney, joins me, anchor of "varney & company" on the fox business network. stuart, this is an interesting one. >> it really is. the left beat up on phil mickelson big-time because he complained about all the tax money he has now got to pay. specifically you had, basically the left is saying
to your other question about what is the federal government doing, we're seeking not just an energy, but across the government to engage entrepreneurs and innovators across all the different sectors. for those of you familiar with the history of the health data initiative launched by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you
for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to show another application from motion launch, the founder and ceo, john, will be sharing some of the work that they're doing. they're based here out of san francisco and they've got a great announcement to make. >> i am jon mills. i'm ceo of motion loft. we started about three years ago developing sensors that we could place around cities that would give us some analytics on how people move around cities and how vehicles drive around cities. so, currently we have 16 neighborhoods -- 18 neighborhoods covered in san francisco, and we get real-time data back that shows exactly h
the federal government to help with the sf rebuild. two weeks ago i attended a ribbon-cutting ceremony when the mayor, i am whole community got the opportunity to tour a 4-unit building. we are progressing and moving in the right direction, departing from the way we have been conducting business as it relates to our housing. it is no surprise that the housing authority has struggle with the more than 200 million unfunded maintenance liability, and decreasing resources from hud. i appreciate the budget analyst's presentation and willingness to work with the board on this particular issue. however there are a number of realities that i want this audit to recognize and incorporate into its framework and i'm going to go down quickly, and circle back and provide you with detailed documentation. just to help shape the conversation. i think it is essential that the audit be done in tandem with hud, currently conducting nodded of the agency. both of you have stated that. it is my understanding that hud will be issuing a corrective plan sometime in march about how the agency can improve. theref
this vote is so important is that even though we as a board of supervisors do not have actual governance of the schools, what we have done in san francisco over the years because of the work of people like -- and gavin newsom and others is that we have recognize that where our state and federal government have fallen short in fulfilling their duties and obligations to properly funding public schools we a city government have stepped in and fill those gaps. the important point is not for us and giving the school district money that it is already entitled to. i'm glad that we will comply with what the law already requires in the intent of those measures were. the whole point of the supplemental is to recognize that we have a fundamental problem in our hands. business as usual is no longer acceptable. we have a city of great wealth; we have the highest performing urban school district in the entire state of california. one of the highest performing urban school districts in the entire country. and yet, for certain groups of kids the system is failing them. and in fact we know that for cer
ceiling. we don't want to shut down the government. so, it looks like republicans are fighting among themselves. so this debate is already underway in the republican party. >> yeah. the. >> the president understands this. that combined with the 332 electoral votes he got, i think he is in a stronger -- i think he is in a stronger position now than he has been probably in four years. so he has less incentive now to be mr. nice than he has in quite some time. i think we are seeing that. >> right. i was going to say, i think we see that he senses that as well. >> yeah. >> he feels that he is projecting it. i don't know whether -- i forget whether you were there the day he announced his measures on gun violence for example. >> yeah. >> that was straight o here is what we are going to do. whereas before on so many issues, they might say, you and i both heard robert gibbs and jay carney say we can't push for that because congress has to do it and we don't have the votes if congress. da-da. the assault weapons ban, right thing to do. join the conversation,
and local government. when i think about the hate crimes cases and the other cases i've done, i've made friends for life with local law enforcement officers, with local da's and local community leaders who have been our eyes and ears. when i look around this audience i really appreciate the fact you have all the ingredients of reform and improvement. i have had the privilege of serving in the federal government, as melinda described, i've had the privilege of serving in state government as a state cabinet official back in maryland, i've had the privilege of serving as a local elected official and governor -- once a local elected official, always a local elected official. what i learned from that is partnership is what it's all about. if you want to confront the most vexing problems, you have to bring people across an ideological spectrum, you have to include the business community, you have to include our nonprofit, our faith leaders. that's how you get things done, when you bring people together. and i look around this room and i see that you have already figured that out. i hope
analytics. i think that's what you'll see happening as well, government starts to become smarter, make better decisions, better policies. this term algorithmic regulation, which means you can have laws and policies in the cities determined by data and not just what we think is best, but what's actually best. so, as cities keep catching on and more and more with the data, you're going to see some really interesting things coming out. >> cool. while we're talking about data, another part of the announcement today was also motion loft making private data available within sort of that initiative and that website wrieri'd like to hear a little more, john, about kind of deciding to share that data with the city and also a lot of times especially with other companies you see them being very protective of their data. there is a lot of value there. how do you sort of balance, protecting the value of your data and commercial viability versus making it available to the public? >> so, we have a unique problem, i think, to a lot of start-ups in the fact that we have a product that we sell and a lot
governments have to operate we have no idea where we get the money over the next 75 years. $88 trillion. that is one point* $05 trillion of bills coming due than we have. if you did not grow the economy at all, a white reporter self in that position? the fed has increased its balance sheet they printed $2 trillion worth of phony many and ultimately the pain will fall on the middle-class and the very core. it is the most -- both parties say they want even if it means we lose our seat reporters cells first instead of the country. it is not hard any citizen if they read back in black there is common-sense ways to save money. just this last week the air force announced this year we spend $64 billion on miti projects 64 billion said gao says half of that will be wasted. it will never be completed. and back in black the city ought to cancel this because it will never work. this is out inefficient government is. finally the air force canceled the spent another 100 million first. they paid the settlement fee to cancel of $8 million. but the person responsible did not get fired and not held acco
the committee process to happen. this is an important part of city government to include public discussion and allowing people to talk. welcome class of 2013. thank you. >> president: thank you. next speaker. >> good afternoon. my name is ernestine wise [sounds like]. i want to congratulate all members of the board and welcome london breed and norman yee. congratulations. [indiscernible] the best one when whoever it is, a woman or black. for a woman there is a lot of anger about -- on the waterfront. a lot of people have voted for the unjustly, 31,000 signatures offer to put it on the ballot for the people to vote. remember, you are here to represent the people not the developers. furthermore we don't need high-rise condo, 136 feet. we don't need a park. i presided ferry park, along the waterfront. we don't need another little park on the waterfront. don't be convinced by this developer that he's doing the right thing, by breaking through jackson street and all that hogwash. vote the will of the people. that's what you are here to represent. thank you very much. >> next speaker. >> than
job you shouldn't get paid. >> i'm tired of government governing by gimmicks. >> reporter: the senate hasn't pass ad budget in almost four years. >> the last time they pass ad budget the ipad hadn't been introduced. >> reporter: paul ryan will draft the budget with deeper cuts. that's a carrot to get conservatives to go along but some still want to see cuts first. >> will not vote to raise the debt ceiling unless significant efforts are made to fix the under lying problems. >> reporter: senate democrats hint theology pass a budget but not soon. >> approach that when we need to. >> reporter: the white house says even in short term the president will sign pinpoint >> the debt ceiling ought not to be a political football. >> reporter: this republican retreat with one last tanned if they can't compromise lawmakers' paychecks could take a hit. what's still not known is if this is temporary passing this budget and this extension of the debt limit. if it's temporary we could still see a credit downgrade. >> we hope that does not happen. tracie potts in washington, d.c., thanks you. >> jill k
it be for the government to access details of yourom activities? it turns out those asks -- requests are skyrocketing. new at noon, janine de la vega tell us why even google cannot do much to protect your information. >> reporter: if you are a google user, then this matters. a new report out by the search engine shows the government is increasingly requesting information about users. >> i don't like the fact that the government is coming in and requesting information about personal usage and certain things like that, you know, i don't think it is any -- none of their business, basically. >> reporter: today, google released its report and this shows that data requests have increased by more than 70% since 2009. this man says he's surprised the number is not higher and some should be concerned for their privacy. >> i think folks need to consider, particularly if they are searching at or in some other public venue where they are being actively monitored what they are doing could reflect them on -- on them poorly. >> reporter: 68% of the requests to google were from subpoenas which are easier to get because a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 422 (some duplicates have been removed)